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Al Jaffee, A Legendary Mad Magazine Cartoonist Dies at 102

A Mad Magazine’s award-winning cartoonist Al Jaffee dies at 102 from multiple organ failure. Jaffee was famously known for his "Snappy Answers to Stupid Questions," which contains moronic questions.
Mad Magazine cartoonist Al Jaffee Dies at 102 (Photo: The New York Times)

A Mad Magazine’s award-winning cartoonist Al Jaffee dies at 102 from multiple organ failure. Jaffee was famously known for his “Snappy Answers to Stupid Questions,” which contains moronic questions.

A Mad Magazine’s award-winning cartoonist Al Jaffee dies at 102 from multiple organ failure. Jaffee was famously known for his "Snappy Answers to Stupid Questions," which contains moronic questions.

Mad Magazine cartoonist Al Jaffee Dies at 102 (Photo: Popverse)

Al Jaffee as the Mad Magazine Cartoonist

Mad is an American humorous magazine that was very popular during the baby-boom era and it also became an inspiration to immeasurable future comedians. For decades, Al Jaffee became part of the Mad magazine and produced varieties of Fold-Ins.

Readers of Mad Magazine enjoyed his Fold-Ins, reading the inside back cover after reading through other favorites such as Antonio Prohías’ “Spy vs. Spy” and Dave Berg’s “The Lighter Side.”

The idea of Fold-Ins was originally a parody of the old Sports Illustrated and Playboy magazine foldouts. Al Jaffee’s fold-ins started at the full-page drawing and has a question on top, folded two selected points to the middle, then produced a new and astonishing image along with the answer.

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Fold-Ins Becoming a Hit

The concept of Fold-Ins was supposed to be a one-time gag but there was a time when Al Jaffee satirized Elizabeth Taylor dumping her husband, Eddie Fisher, in favor of “Cleopatra” co-star Richard Burton. In the picture, Jaffee first showed Taylor and Burton arm in arm on the one side of the picture, and on the other side a young, handsome man being held back by a policeman. When you fold the picture in, Taylor and the young man are kissing. That was the start of the Fold-Ins becoming a hit.

Jaffee had a long career before he worked with Mad Magazine. He was part of Timely Comics, and he was also part of the New York Herald where for several years he sketched the “Tall Tales”.

Jaffee outlived virtually all of the magazine’s stars, then Mad slowly lost its readership and edge after the 1970s.

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