June 20, 2019
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The passage of Proposition 64 in 2016 legalized the recreational use of cannabis throughout the state. However, a group of Santa Clarita residents concerned about the influence of cannabis on California’s youth have started to gather signatures to overturn the proposition.

“Marijuana is poisoning our children’s minds,” Valencia resident Karen York said. “How am I supposed to protect my kids from all the people coming over the border peddling these awful drugs?”

York is one of dozens of concerned parents working to gather enough signatures to place a measure overturning Proposition 64 on the 2020 general election ballot. She and her neighbor, Sharon Anderson, are the co-founders of Moms Against Weed, the local grassroots group spearheading the movement.

“Our local leaders have been working so hard to defend our city from not just marijuana, but everything else that comes with it, like the gays and the illegals,” Anderson said. “Unfortunately, despite our city’s best efforts, the people in Sacramento just don’t care about preserving the integrity of our communities. That’s why we started Moms Against, to help our city officials in the fight.”

The group has been advocating for restrictions on local cannabis sales, deliveries and use since the passage of Proposition 64. In January of 2017, the Santa Clarita City Council unanimously passed a moratorium on cannabis sales within the city.

“Santa Clarita has always been at the forefront of protecting California from terrible, horrific substances,” Councilmember Bob Kellar said. “This signature-gathering operation is just what we need to show Sacramento that the citizens of California will not tolerate anyone smoking dope in our state.”

State Senator Scott Wilk (R-Lancaster) also supports overturning Proposition 64, but for more economic reasons. Although he voted against reducing cannabis-related convictions and voted against regulating cannabis used for medical purposes, Wilk is in favor of farming hemp — the fiber of cannabis plants. In 2018, he authored SB 1409, which was signed into law earlier this year and allows California farmers to grow industrial hemp and to produce hemp seed, oil, fiber and extract.

“My bill, SB 1409, was a big win for the hemp industry and our local economy,” Wilk said. “If we’re going to keep marijuana legal, we need it to support our local economy, not economies like the one in San Fernando Valley.”

In addition to working with local and state officials, the grassroots organization also recently met with Rep. Katie Hill (D-Agua Dulce) — who, as a member of Congress, does not oversee issues such as ballot measures — to discuss their vision for California.

“I don’t necessarily agree with their position,” Hill said. “However, I represent a purple district, and so I really welcome everyone’s different perspectives on this issue.”

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Summary
Local residents collect signatures to overturn Proposition 64
Article Name
Local residents collect signatures to overturn Proposition 64
Description
A group of Santa Clarita residents concerned about the influence of cannabis on California's youth have started to gather signatures to overturn Proposition 64.
Author
Publisher Name
The Santa Clarita Valley Proclaimer
Proclaimer Staff

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2 COMMENTS

  1. Ollie Posted on April 1, 2019 at 2:21 pm

    April Fools, right? “Our local leaders have been working so hard to defend our city from not just marijuana, but everything else that comes with it, like the gays and the illegals,”

  2. Stephen Daniels Posted on April 2, 2019 at 12:31 pm

    Happy April Fool’s Day!

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